Ancient Roman Music – Musica Romana – Pugnate V

 

Channel: Aemilius Paulus
Duration: 4:25
Description:
Tracks “Gladiatrices”, “Imperator”, and “Oktokaidekasimos Hydraulikon” from Pugnate album. Musica Romana is a well-known, internationally-acclaimed music ensemble dedicated to recreating the Ancient Roman music. Among other things, their music was featured the Europa Barbarorum, a video game mod for Rome: Total War. The Pugnate (Latin: fight!) album recreates the music at the gladiatorial games of Imperial Rome.
Published: October 19, 2009 5:53 pm

Ancient Roman Music – Musica Romana – Pugnate VI

 

Channel: Aemilius Paulus
Duration: 5:6
Description: Tracks “Hymnus Nemesis”, “Pugnate “, and “Iugula!” from Pugnate album. Musica Romana is a well-known, internationally-acclaimed music ensemble dedicated to recreating the Ancient Roman music. Among other things, their music was featured the Europa Barbarorum, a video game mod for Rome: Total War. The Pugnate (Latin: fight!) album recreates the music at the gladiatorial games of Imperial Rome.
Published: October 19, 2009 5:54 pm

Ancient Roman Music – Musica Romana I

 

Channel:Aemilius Paulus
Duration:6:10
Description:
Tracks “XVII” and “Cave Carminem” from Symphonia Panica album. Musica Romana is a well-known, internationally-acclaimed music ensemble dedicated to recreating the Ancient Roman music. Among other things, their music was featured the Europa Barbarorum, a video game mod for Rome: Total War.
Published: October 19, 2009 5:48 pm

Ancient Greek & Roman Writers

 

Channel: Miracle Institute English Literature [ UGC-NET ]
Duration: 11:7
Description: This video is about Classical Greek. Greek is the oldest civilization as per the existing records. Poetry took birth in ancient Greece, from there it came to Rome and then England. The greek Mythology forms the base of most of Ancient Literature.

This video is about ancient Roman/ Italian Authors, who formed the Golden age of Rome during the reign of Augustus Ceasar. Ovid, Boccaccio , Dante, Petrarch Virgil

Latin literature drew heavily on the traditions of other cultures, particularly the more matured literary tradition of Greece, and the strong influence of earlier Greek authors is readily apparent. Few works remain of Early and Old Latin, although a few of the plays of Plautus and Terence have come down to us.

The “Golden Age of Roman Literature” is usually considered to cover the period from about the start of the 1st Century BCE up to the mid-1st Century CE.

The emperor Augustus took a personal interest in the literary works produced during his years of power from 27 BC to AD 14. This period is sometimes called the Augustan Age of Latin Literature. Virgil published his pastoral Eclogues, the Georgics, and the Aeneid, an epic poem describing the events that led to the creation of Rome. Virgil told how the Trojan hero Aeneas became the ancestor of the Roman people. Virgil also provided divine justification for Roman rule over the world. Although Virgil died before he could put the finishing touches on his poem, it was soon recognized as the greatest work of Latin literature.

Ovid was a witty writer who excelled in creating lively and passionate characters. The Metamorphoses was the best-known source of Roman mythology throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. It inspired many poets, painters, and composers.

Published: January 5, 2017 12:36 pm

The Roman Economy: An Introduction

 

Channel: Dr. Donal McGay
Duration: 10:13
Description: We describe the nature of the Roman economy, with a focus on coinage and the debasement of currency following the Crisis of the Third Century. Additionally, we discuss geopolitical factors that influenced the Roman economic reforms, under Diocletian and afterwards. Conclusions about the Roman decline are drawn.
Published: May 28, 2015 3:27 pm

Mary Beard’s Ultimate Rome: Empire Without Limit.

 

Channel: Oscar Gonzalez
Duration: 58:43
Description: In this episode, Mary Beard reaches back to the myths and legends of the origins of Rome to gain an insight into the deep-rooted psyche of the people of Rome – a city born through fratricide and rape. But from the very beginning, Rome was also an asylum for outcasts and exiles and because of this, it adopted a uniquely inclusive approach towards its neighbours and defeated enemies. The expansion of the city brought territory in first in Italy and Sicily, where Rome first came head to head and eventually defeated her great rival, Carthage.
Mary then travels to Greece, where Rome adopted a complex mix of brute force and cultural cringe, and France, where she finds evidence of war methods akin to outright genocide. In typical myth-busting style, Mary argues that the period of greatest Roman expansion occurred when Rome itself was little more than a provincial backwater, a shantytown of mud and brick. The marble, monumental Rome we know came about because of imperial conquest – not the other way round. And likewise, the creation and possession of an empire transformed the politics of Rome forever, creating the conditions for one-man rule, and ending the centuries-old Roman Republic.
Published: May 2, 2016 3:12 pm